HH 32, one of the brightest Herbig–Haro objects
HH 32, one of the brightest
Herbig–Haro objects

Herbig–Haro objects are bright nebular patches formed when narrow jets of partially ionized gas ejected from newborn stars collide with clouds of gas and dust. Often aligned with a star's rotational axis, they are commonly found in star-forming regions. Most of them lie within a few light-years of the source. They are transient phenomena, lasting around a few tens of thousands of years. They can change visibly over just a few years, as they move rapidly away from their parent star. First observed in the late 19th century by Sherburne Wesley Burnham, Herbig–Haro objects were not recognized as distinct from other emission nebulas until the 1940s. The first astronomers to study them in detail were George Herbig and Guillermo Haro, who independently recognized that the objects were by-products of the star formation process. Although the objects emit visible wavelengths, many are hidden by dust and gas, and can only be seen at infrared wavelengths. (Full article...)

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This meeting of the Joomla! Compliance Team has been held on September 18, 2019 at 16.30 CET on Glip.

Participants

In attendance: Achilleas Papageorgiou, Luca Marzo, Roland Dalmulder, Sander Potjer, Alkaios Anagnostopoulos.

Discussion outline

  • Achilleas shared with the team the latest discussions they had with Luca and Kleanthis regarding the updates that should be done on the IRP doc in order to be useful and completed.
  • Alkaios didn’t have any updates on his work on the cookie script due to overworking the latest week. Alkaios will work the upcoming week to finalize the cookie script both JS and PHP part that will allow the script perform as expected on each property. Achilleas to support his work anywhere
...

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Suillus bovinus

Suillus bovinus, the Jersey cow mushroom, is a pored mushroom in the family Suillaceae. A common fungus native to Europe and Asia, it has been introduced to North America and Australia. It was initially described as Boletus bovinus by Carl Linnaeus in 1753, and given its current binomial name by Henri François Anne de Roussel in 1806. It is an edible mushroom, though not highly regarded. The fungus grows in coniferous forests in its native range, and pine plantations elsewhere. It is sometimes parasitised by the related mushroom Gomphidius roseus. S. bovinus produces spore-bearing mushrooms, often in large numbers, each with a convex grey-yellow or ochre cap reaching up to 10 cm (4 in) in diameter, flattening with age. As in other boletes, the cap has spore tubes extending downward from the underside, rather than gills. The pore surface is yellow. The stalk, more slender than those of other Suillus boletes, lacks a ring. (Full article...)

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Sutton Hoo Exhibition Hall.jpg

Sutton Hoo Helmet is a 2002 sculpture by the English artist Rick Kirby. A representation of the Anglo-Saxon helmet of the same name found in the Sutton Hoo ship-burial, it was commissioned by the National Trust to hang outside the Sutton Hoo visitor centre. Together with the centre, the sculpture was unveiled by Nobel laureate Seamus Heaney on 13 March 2002. Weighing 900 kg (2,000 lb), it is 1.8 m (5.9 ft) high, 1.2 m (3.9 ft) wide and 1.6 m (5.2 ft) deep. It is made of mild steel plates that are coloured red. Designed to have a "fierce presence", it is inspired by the fragmentary appearance of the reconstructed helmet rather than the glistening replica made by the Royal Armouries. Steel is Kirby's favoured medium, allowing the sense of scale and dramatic impact found in Sutton Hoo Helmet. The sculpture is illustrative of Kirby's largely figural body of work, and its mask-like quality has been repeated in subsequent pieces. (Full article...)

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James Park Woods VC

James Park Woods (1886–1963) was an Australian recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that could be awarded to members of the Australian armed forces at the time. Woods enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force in September 1916, and joined the 48th Battalion in France in September 1917. He participated in the First Battle of Passchendaele the following month. In 1918, Woods was hospitalised twice, finally returning to his unit in mid-August. On 18 September, the 48th Battalion was involved in the attack on the Hindenburg Outpost Line. During this battle Woods led a four-man patrol in an attack on a strong German post, inflicting severe casualties and driving more than thirty Germans from the position. His actions during this assault and subsequent defence against German counter-attacks resulted in him being awarded the Victoria Cross. His medals are now displayed in the Hall of Valour at the Australian War Memorial. (Full article...)

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